Dissertations List

All Stanford dissertations and theses are listed in SearchWorks. (From the home page, click the “Dissertations & theses” link under Featured resources. Limit any search result by selecting "Thesis/Dissertation” under Genre in the left column.)

Most Stanford dissertations written between 1989 and 2009 are available as PDFs from Proquest. You can access these directly from Dissertations & Theses @ Stanford or from the Searchworks record.

If the thesis or dissertation was filed in a digital format (this option was available starting in November 2009) it may not be indexed in the Dissertations & Theses @ Stanford database, but it will be available through a direct link in the SearchWorks record and from Google. If the student opted for embargo restrictions, some of or the entire dissertation may not be available for up to five years after the submission date.

You can submit a request to view a print copy of a dissertation in the Special Collections & University Archives department (library use only). The SearchWorks record will indicate if there is a circulating print copy that you can check out.

You can purchase copies of Stanford dissertations completed before 2010 via UMI Dissertation Express from ProQuest.

By Adrienne K.H. Rose

In her monthly column, Prof. Adrienne K.H. Rose explores issues surrounding translation within Classics. In her first edition, she addresses the challenges of picking the “right” Catullus translation. What does “right” even mean when choosing a translation for class?

Choosing the “right” translation of any Classical author for the classroom is a challenge for most teachers. What is “right” can often be dependent upon factors such as availability and pricing, particularly for students with a textbook budget. For a popular, much-translated poet like Catullus there is a wealth of English-language translations to choose from. Catullus is antiquity’s most modern poet.

His work is raunchy, moody, turbulently charged political and social commentary – my advanced Latin students called him “emo”—his carmina akin to unfiltered Facebook status updates perhaps better left unposted. At the same time they’re fastidious metrically, driven by Hellenic fascination (Grecomania?), and fixated by core human emotions and needs: internal conflict, affection, lust, mourning, and spite. Because Catullus is so contemporary, translations reinvent his persona anew with updated, contemporary language and cultural references.

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